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6th Annual Spot Prawn Festival
Saturday, May 5 2012
11am – 3pm
False Creek Fishermen’s Wharf (just west of Granville Island)

6th Annual BC Spot Prawn Festival

6th Annual BC Spot Prawn Festival

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On Saturday, May 5th, 2012, the city’s top chefs will prepare a spot prawn boil at False Creek Fishermen’s Wharf benefiting The Chefs’ Table Society of British Columbia.

The festival kicks off the BC spot prawn season, which continues on for 6-8 weeks. During this time, you’ll have the opportunity to buy live, locally sourced, and sustainable prawns direct off the dock. Get your catch daily from 1pm onwards at the False Creek Fishermen’s Wharf (just west of Granville Island).

Canada’s largest Spot Prawn Festival and Prawn Boil makes fresh, right off the boat, local spot prawns available for hundreds to taste.  Get inspired by our cooking demos then grab your own bagful off the fishing boats ($12 per lb) to recreate these dishes at home.

For further event details, visit http://www.chefstablesociety.com/

Raincity Grill’s Peter Robertson presents:

POACHED BC SPOT PRAWN, OYAMA BACON, MAPLE, GRANVILLE ISLAND SAKE CONDIMENT

Ingredients:
2kg spot prawns

Court bouillon:
4ltr water
2g peppercorns
2g coriander seeds
1 bay leaf
1 sprig thyme
1 lemon sliced
40g salt

For the condiment:
100g sake kasu
25g honey
25g mustard
25g mirin
25g sherry vinegar
500ml canola oil
200g Oyama bacon
100ml maple syrup
100g diced shallot
25g chopped chives

Method:

Bring the court bouillon to a boil and pour over the spot prawns, stand for 5 minutes, drain and shell the prawns.

Dice the bacon and sauté on a medium heat until evenly browned, drain off excess fat and add the syrup, continue to cook for a further 5 min, reserve.

Combine sake, honey, mirin, vinegar, mustard in blender, blend and add oil and emulsify, fold in bacon, shallots and chive.

Recipe courtesy of GranvilleIsland.com

As posted in Vancouver Magazine

Ingredient of the Year 2008

B.C. spot prawns
By published May 19, 2008
Spot Prawn

Over 900,000 tonnes of Tiger prawns are harvested annually, roughly two- thirds coming from warm-water farms that dot the deltas of Southeast Asia. It’s a relatively new and very profitable industry in producer nations like Vietnam, and it has badly wounded the communities that support it. Along with environmental damage have come disease, debt, and dispossession. Despite these sad facts (not to mention that the prawns often feast on antibiotics and growth hormones), the prawns remain an attractive commodity on the global market. Predictable by virtue of their blandness and cheap availability year-round, farmed Tigers will always be an easy sell. Mushy in texture and almost devoid of flavour, they remain manufactured ghosts, shadows of the real thing. (Indeed, if this were a piece on the worst ingredient of the year, farmed prawns would most certainly crack the shortlist.)

The strongest argument against them is that we have always had a superior alternative sourced by fishermen right here at home. Sweet and delicately flavoured, firm on the incisors and succulent on the molars, the B.C. spot prawn—largest of all our local prawns—is one of the finest and best-tasting crustaceans that our oceans surrender. And the fishermen use baited traps on buoy lines, keeping habitat damage and by-catch to a minimum. Supply of the spot prawn has long been ample, but local demand had been minimal. The short season, six- to eight-weeks beginning in May, made it a delicacy overseas and doomed the domestic market. Ninety percent of the catch was whisked to Asia, the remainder going to the few restaurants and markets around B.C. willing to pay a premium price. Enter the Chef’s Table Society. Last May, the local collective of conscientious food lovers, chefs, and restaurateurs helped to develop and promote Vancouver’s first day-boat spot-prawn fishery. To raise public awareness they hosted the 1st Annual Spot Prawn Festival at False Creek’s Fisherman’s Wharf. The event introduced Vancouver chefs and home cooks to the best local ingredient they’d never heard of, and ensured the spot prawn a place on our more forward-thinking menus for years to come.

Announced on Monday, April 14, at the 19th Annual Restaurant Awards, held at the Sheraton Vancouver Wall Centre Hotel. (18 Apr 2008) Vancouver Magazine

18 April 2008

By Andrew Morrison

Announced on Monday, April 14, at the 19th Annual Restaurant Awards, held at the Sheraton Vancouver Wall Centre Hotel.

Over 900,000 tonnes of Tiger prawns are harvested annually, roughly two- thirds coming from warm-water farms that dot the deltas of Southeast Asia. It’s a relatively new and very profitable industry in producer nations like Vietnam, and it has badly wounded the communities that support it. Along with environmental damage have come disease, debt, and dispossession. Despite these sad facts (not to mention that the prawns often feast on antibiotics and growth hormones), the prawns remain an attractive commodity on the global market. Predictable by virtue of their blandness and cheap availability year-round, farmed Tigers will always be an easy sell. Mushy in texture and almost devoid of flavour, they remain manufactured ghosts, shadows of the real thing. (Indeed, if this were a piece on the worst ingredient of the year, farmed prawns would most certainly crack the shortlist.)

The strongest argument against them is that we have always had a superior alternative sourced by fishermen right here at home. Sweet and delicately flavoured, firm on the incisors and succulent on the molars, the B.C. spot prawn—largest of all our local prawns—is one of the finest and best-tasting crustaceans that our oceans surrender. And the fishermen use baited traps on buoy lines, keeping habitat damage and by-catch to a minimum. Supply of the spot prawn has long been ample, but local demand had been minimal. The short season, six- to eight-weeks beginning in May, made it a delicacy overseas and doomed the domestic market. Ninety percent of the catch was whisked to Asia, the remainder going to the few restaurants and markets around B.C. willing to pay a premium price. Enter the Chef’s Table Society. Last May, the local collective of conscientious food lovers, chefs, and restaurateurs helped to develop and promote Vancouver’s first day-boat spot-prawn fishery. To raise public awareness they hosted the 1st Annual Spot Prawn Festival at False Creek’s Fisherman’s Wharf. The event introduced Vancouver chefs and home cooks to the best local ingredient they’d never heard of, and ensured the spot prawn a place on our more forward-thinking menus for years to come.

2nd Annual Spot Prawn Festival: Fisherman’s Wharf, May 2. For more information visit Chefstablesociety.com

Source:  Vancouver Magazine

BCPrawns.com is the web home of BC Spot Prawns.  Our modern vessel the ‘Gulf Rascal’ fishes sustainable spot prawns, Pandalus platyceros,  in the cold, clean waters of Jervis Inlet north of Vancouver, British Columbia.

Our wild spot prawns are trap caught and delivered live to Pender Harbour on the Sunshine Coast.  We take pride in offering wild and sustainable spot prawns directly from the boat to the public.  Look for the ‘Gulf Rascal‘ at the Govt Dock in Madeira Park.

We offer live prawns and fresh tails in season and sharp frozen tails and frozen whole prawns following the season.

Also fresh and frozen octopus.

Gulf Rascal - Prawn Boat

Gulf Rascal in Madeira Park

According to the SeaChoice organization (a watch dog group concerned with the health of our fisheries and oceans):

Wild, trap-caught, B.C. spot prawns are a SeaChoice “Best Choice” option based on the five sustainability criteria used for our fisheries assessments: inherent vulnerability to fishing pressure; status of wild stocks; nature and extent of discarded by catch; effect of fishing practices on habitats and ecosystems; and effectiveness of the management regime.

There are seven commercial species of shrimp found in Canada’s west coast waters. All cold water shrimp are fast-growing, short-lived, and have a high reproductive capacity, making these species less vulnerable to fishing pressure.

Spot prawn fishermen along the B.C. coast use baited traps on long lines attached to buoys. The amount of other species that inadvertently end up in these prawn traps as by-catch is relatively low. This gear type is also associated with a relatively low amount of habitat damage.

Our BC Spot Prawn Fishery is recognized and endorsed as a ‘green’ and recommended fishery by:


Are you aware of what you might be eating with imported prawns?   Yes , they are cheap but at what price comes cheap!  Read the postings in Farmed Prawns the Dark Side


If you are visiting our Sunshine Coast do check out PenderHarbour.org for everything you may need to know about Pender Harbour.

Gulf Rascal

Pender Harbour Prawn Charters

Have you ever wondered what it would be like to get out and catch spot prawns?  Join us on board our prawn vessel,  MV ‘Gulf Rascal’,  to set and pull the prawn traps just as we do it during the commercial season.

The Gulf Rascal is a modern, high speed, 34′ aluminum vessel built for prawning.  All traps and gear are provided.

You bring appropriate weather clothing.  Sport fishing licenses are available here if you need them.

spot prawn trapSmall groups up to 8 people can enjoy an exciting and educational 1/2 day water experience.  Children are welcome.

We depart and return to the government dock in Madeira Park (Pender Harbour).  Our recommended tour is a trip up Jervis Inlet to Egmont and through the Skookumchuk Rapids.  Along the way we will set and pull prawn traps.  The prawning is hands on so be prepared to sort the prawns.

We can tailor your Pender Harbour Charter to your needs.  Ask about pulling crab pots.

Fishing Charters

We now offer full and 1/2 day fishing charters in local Pender Harbour waters.  Catch Pacific Ling,  Greenling,  Rockfish,  Salmon, Crabs and Prawns from the Gulf Rascal.  Larger groups welcome.  Book now – 604-741-3683.  Visit Gulf Rascal Charters in Pender Harbour at www.gulfrascalcharters.com

 

For more details or to book please call:  604-741-3683

or email:  bcprawns@nullgmail.com

UBC School of Journalism
Published Sunday, Nov. 21, 2010 7:55PM EST
Last updated Monday, Nov. 22, 2010 12:49PM EST
A student documentary from the UBC Graduate School of Journalism looks at the social and environmental impact of shrimp farming in Thailand and how it impacts North American consumers.
Published in the:  Globe and Mail

20070621_spotprawns.jpg
Huge, luscious BC spot prawns are one of the most delicious things to be found in the waters around Vancouver. Sweet, firm, peachy-pink and tender, the prawns are sustainably harvested by local fishermen, which means I get to enjoy eating them and feel all cozy and self-righteous about it. Score. The brief spot prawn season is on right now, and will only last for another two weeks or so. I trundled down to Fishermen’s Wharf near Granville Island to get my fix.

20070621_fishermenswharf.jpg
The prawn boat was impossible to miss. Chunks of cardboard with PRAWNS! scrawled in magic marker and zap-strapped to the seawall railings pointed the way to the boat itself with its gigantic LIVE PRAWNS! sign. I bought my crustaceans from Steve Johansen of Organic Ocean, who’s there as part of the BC Spot Prawn festival. Sponsored by the wharf and the aquarium’s Oceanwise program, the festival promotes locally sourced, sustainable seafood as an alternative to farmed Southeast Asian prawns, and encourages consumers to buy directly from fishermen.

20070621_spotprawns2.jpg
A pound of prawns cost $12. Steve kindly demonstrated how to decapitate them while still alive–just grip either side of the neck joint and twist. It was surprisingly easy. Visceral, but in a good I’m-connecting-with-the-cycle-of-life way, not in a gory way. I froze the heads to use for seafood broth later on. Steve also sells containers of tails frozen in sea water for $20. I’ve heard live spot prawns can be had for a bit less at T&T supermarkets, but there’s something charming about strolling down to the wharf on a sunny day and buying a bag of live seafood, antennae are still waving in the wind, straight from the boat they were caught on.

20070621_spotprawns3.jpg
Spot prawns are natural fast food: they cook in two minutes in a pot of boiling water. The meat was intensely sweet and tender, without even a hint of fishiness. I ate them with melted garlic butter, new potatoes, and green salad from the West End farmer’s market. Fresh, local, organic, sustainable, ridiculously delicious, and cheaper than even a low-end restaurant meal–what more could I want? If only the season lasted for more than eight weeks!

BC Spot Prawn Festival
1505 West 1st Avenue
Northwest of Granville Island, between the Burrard Street Bridge and the Granville Street Bridge
Boats arrive between 4:30 and 5:30 daily, and on Saturdays around 2:00


Photo of False Creek and the Spot Prawn Festival by Ruth and Dave from the BR Photo Pool.

Banding together for sustainable seafood

Emma Gilchrist, Calgary Herald

Published: Friday, February 20, 2009

If you try to minimize the environmental impact of the food you eat, you likely know how tricky it can be to source sustainable seafood.

The first step in this epic plight is to visit seachoice.org, where you’ll find a downloadable wallet card of Canada’s Seafood Guide.

The card places seafood into three different categories: best choice, some concerns or avoid. On the SeaChoice website, you can also search the database for specific items, geographical areas and methods of capture.

Bluefin tuna has been so heavily over-fished that the World Conservation Union lists southern bluefin tuna in its grouping of most threatened wildlife. Their numbers have declined by 97 per cent during the last four decades.

Bluefin tuna has been so heavily over-fished that the World Conservation Union lists southern bluefin tuna in its grouping of most threatened wildlife. Their numbers have declined by 97 per cent during the last four decades.

You can even download drop cards to leave in your favourite stores and establishments, urging them to offer sustainable seafood choices.

However, if you’re visiting a Fairmont hotel or resort, you won’t need to drop any hints. The international chain recently announced it will remove threatened fish species, such as Chilean Sea Bass, a. k. a. Patagonia Tooth, and Bluefin Tuna, from its restaurant menus and align itself with reputable seafood watch organizations (such as Canada’s SeaChoice).

By making this commitment, Fairmont exerts considerable pressure for healthier practices, which flows down to suppliers, who then offer better choices to restaurants. (That’s what we call the opposite of a vicious circle.)

Fairmont will also make it easier for guests to make informed food choices by identifying responsible seafood choices on its restaurant menus.

Now, if only the federal government would help ensure seafood in stores and markets is as well-labelled as it will be in Fairmont restaurants!

The David Suzuki Foundation has just launched a campaign that hopes to push us in that direction by calling on federal government officials to implement stricter seafood labelling regulations.

“Canadians across the country are using SeaChoice’s seafood guide to empower them to eat well and to support sustainable fisheries, so that future generations can eat healthy fish too,”writes the foundation in an action call. “However, in order to make best use of the SeaChoice consumer guide, our seafood needs to contain information about exactly what kind of fish it is, where it was caught, how it was caught or farmed and whether it contains any additives or health warnings.”

The foundation is calling on concerned Canadians to send letters asking that Canada create national seafood labelling requirements that allow Canadians to make responsible sustainable seafood choices to: the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans, Gail Shea; the Minister of Agriculture, Gerry Ritz; and the president of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, Carole Swan.

Visit davidsuzuki.org and then click on “Conserving our oceans” to send these letters in the click of a mouse.

The foundation also encourages concerned citizens to share their letters with local seafood restaurants and grocery stores so that seafood retailers know what their customers are looking for.

Tell us what you’re doing to protect the environment. E-mail

egilchrist@nulltheherald.canwest.com

Prawn Care

BC Spot Prawns frozen in the shell are convenient and versatile. Leave the shell on for a quick boil or grilling on the barbecue or in a pan.

The shells come off easily for a stir fry.  Peel the top few bands of shell then pinch the tail to quickly remove the meat.

Thawing Instructions

  • Quick thawing can be achieved by running cold water over the prawns for 10 minutes, moving them around to ensure all are properly defrosted.  This is recommended.
  • Conventional thawing can be achieved by placing prawns or sealed bag in the refrigerator for 5-8 hours. Drain off excess liquid.

Safe Handling Instructions

  • BC Spot Prawns must not be over-thawed, refrozen or left sitting in their own juices or water. Once thawed use BC Spot Prawns immediately.
  • Frozen BC Spot Prawns will retain their quality for up to twelve months if stored at or below  -25°C.

Preparation Instructions

  • BC Spot Prawns are convenient and easy to prepare. They are well suited to many types of preparations including boil,  sauté,  steaming,  broiling and grilling on the barbeque.
  • For best results cook BC Spot Prawns  as soon as they are thawed.
  • Care should be taken not to overcook BC Spot Prawns with the best results achieved when cooked under  2  minutes.  As soon as the meat turns from translucent to opaque white they are done.  When boiling it is recommended to pull from the pot when the boiled prawns ‘look up’ to rise to the top.  Remove from the heat and give a quick cool rinse to stop cooking  Under cooking  is encouraged and results in a sweet and succulent prawn.
  • Flash freezing gives a cold ‘cooked’ product and allows for use as sashimi or “ebi”.

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